Commit #4 : My top seven clean code practices


Hi there, fellow readers! It’s been more than a month from my latest commit, where I promised this post will be published a week after 😅 Sorry for the delay! I got my hands full for a month 😓

As I said before, the Clean Code book got tons of useful practices. In this post, I want to show you how I applied a few of them in my code – which mostly is Objective-C, hence the examples on this post 😉 I believe I don’t always get it right either, so I’d love to hear from you if I got something wrong on how I applied it! 😁

So, here’s the top seven clean code practices I mostly use! 😆

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Commit #3 : Clean code matters

*dusting blog*

*coughs*

Hi there! It’s been months since my latest post commit here, work life sure can be tight 😅  After two tutorials, let’s try some different type of commit, shall we? This time, I want to share about a book that changed the way how I code.

It was on my early days in Ice House. Some of our higher-ups just came back from US and brought technical books for us. I was reading a copy of  The Pragmatic Programmer at that time, so I didn’t really looked at the new books. After a few days, Ridhwan handed a copy of Clean Code to me, and said this:

Check this book out, do. My code structure changed a lot, even only by reading a few chapter of it.

I took it with a so-so feeling. I was reading the Pragmatic Programmer, and that book made me feel worthless. It was full of best practices that I haven’t done (yet), so full of it that I was confused where should I begin with. I was unsure whether I can take something practical out of Clean Code. I was afraid (duh) that it will make me feel worthless again. Yet, I ended up reading it. It was recommended by the prodigy*, so… why not?

I read the introduction (it suggests amazing measurement for code quality) and the first chapter, and BAM – these paragraphs pops out:

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